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Middle East

Forty-eight men and women, theologians and researchers from the Middle East, participated in producing the first Arabic Contemporary Commentary. […] Read More

At the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva in March, a man sitting next to me was writing in Arabic the statement that he would be reading to the council. Adel was a Tunisian head of a nonprofit. I said hello in Arabic, and we introduced ourselves and exchanged cards. He looked down at […] Read More

Ambassador Massoud Al-Maalouf, former Lebanese ambassador to the United States, denounced the devastating role of U.S. evangelicals in shaping toxic U.S. foreign policies toward the Middle East, particularly toward the Palestinian cause. The Al-Joumhouriah Daily Lebanese newspaper published his op-ed on Feb. 7, 2018. His depiction of evangelicals in this article is simplistic and rich […] Read More

Humanitarian tourism, while often well-intentioned, raises questions about its purpose, as well as its efficacy in addressing human needs and alleviating suffering. As I explained previously, the term “sufferari” seems an appropriate label for these excursions due to similarities with a safari. The question I pose concerning the sufferari among displaced individuals is not, “Is […] Read More

Landscapes throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region have been transformed by unfolding crises of forced migration. This is especially the case in Lebanon. An estimated 1.5 million Syrian refugees reside within its borders, adding layers of dimension to long-existing populations of displacement. According to the U.N. Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), Lebanon […] Read More

The concept of “disorienting times” was the focus of the Arab Baptist Theological Seminary’s 14th Middle East Conference / Consultation (June 19-23), organized by its Institute of Middle East Studies. Highlights from the 2017 consultation are available here. Four themes – Persecution and Suffering; Emigration; Hopelessness and Despair; and Minoritization – were integrated and engaged […] Read More

The practice of “taqiyya” (dissimulation or concealment) has been redefined as a religious obligation for Muslims to lie to non-Muslims in order to serve the expansionist agenda of their religious community. This is a false understanding that has gained traction in the West, as I explained previously. Islam only permits its adherents to dissimulate their […] Read More

“In post 9/11 anti-Muslim discourse, ‘taqiyya’ has been redefined as a religious obligation for Muslims to lie to non-Muslims not simply for survival, but in order to serve the expansionist agenda of their religious community.” According to the “taqiyya”-focused strand of the anti-Muslim moral panic, Muslims stand condemned for their participation in this hidden agenda […] Read More

One hundred years after the Balfour Declaration and the Sykes-Picot Agreement, the world is still struggling with the same questions concerning Christians and Muslims in the Middle East. Can Muslims and Christians coexist in peace? Is there a government structure that protects both communities and treats them with equity? Is Islam inherently violent and incapable […] Read More

One hundred years ago, on Nov. 2, the Foreign Secretary of the United Kingdom, Lord Balfour, issued a letter on behalf of his government that favored the establishment of a national home for the Jewish people in Palestine. Perceived as a fair resolution to Jewish persecution in Europe, the letter, known as the Balfour Declaration, […] Read More