Skip to site content

Study Shows Religious Youth More Positive

High school seniors who said religion was important to them also had more positive attitudes about themselves than those who said religion was not important.

The National Study of Youth and Religion, based at the <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags” />University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has found a significant positive correlation between religion and self-esteem among high school seniors.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” />
 
The study also revealed that youth who attended religious services—no matter how often—were more likely to have a positive outlook than those who never attended religious services.
 
Thirty-eight percent of youth who attended religious services at least once a week agreed with the statement, “I take a positive attitude toward myself.” Thirty-five percent of those who rarely attend agreed with the statement, while only 26 percent of high school seniors who never attend religious services agreed with the statement.
 
High school seniors who said religion was important to them also had more positive attitudes about themselves than those who said religion was not important.
 
More than 43 percent of seniors who said religion was very important said they thought positively about themselves, while only 27 percent of seniors who said religion was not important felt the same way.
 
This study is part of ongoing research to enhance understanding of the religious and spiritual lives of U.S. adolescents.